Crap. We’ve got cattle again.

They all got rounded up and hauled off a month or so and I thought that was the end of them for the cold season. Apparently not so.


They’re baaaack. Just chased this bunch out of my yard.

I hate frickin’ cattle. At least this time of year they can’t eat my flowers.

About Joel

You shouldn't ask these questions of a paranoid recluse, you know.
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13 Responses to Crap. We’ve got cattle again.

  1. Jim Price says:

    Ya know, Joel, they make rubber and hard nylon balls for paintball guns. Should be very effective against critters. Even those as big as cows. They’re cheap and reusable. And they leave no evidence.
    https://smile.amazon.com/Paintballs-Paintball-Shooting-Training-Practice/dp/B0B3QH2R44/ref=sr_1_5?crid=316INNMKLJ2GY&keywords=paintball%2Brubber%2Bbullets&qid=1668815326&sprefix=paintball%2Brubb%2Caps%2C242&sr=8-5&th=1

  2. Mike says:

    Mr. Price is right. If you can scrounge up a cheap paintball gun, dusting cows with nylon balls would be the ticket to driving them off. The cows are probably too stupid to stay away, but this would be better than nothing.

  3. Anonymous says:

    I’m confused. Is there a rotation that makes sense, ie growing season vs barren ground. Why are they reintroducing cattle when they were just removed

  4. Anonymous says:

    Ya’ll gone throw away them jackstands?

  5. Spud says:

    Put up a fence then. You are living in free range country , but you can put a perimeter fence to control access .

  6. stan winston says:

    Slingshots work well too.
    Best that the animal not know that its you doing the stinging so they dont realize where the bad juju is coming from. If they think its the Hand of God doing it, theyre more likely to avoid the area instead of the person.

  7. Johno says:

    Joel, a couple of items that scare cattle, without you having to buy extra hardware, are.Cattle Crackers and Bird Frite, both in 12Ga., or the low-tech but mighty effective no.10 shot. So long as they are 35 – 45 yards off, it’ll sting them but not penetrate their hide, leaving no evidence that you encouraged them to “move along, little doggies, move along”.
    Of course, as others have suggested before, if a poddy calf was to drop dead, and found itself in your freezer, in convenient meal-size packaging, who’s to know?

  8. RCPete says:

    Around here (S Oregon, east of the Cascades), most of the cattle get sent to market in the fall, but the ranchers will keep the bulls over the winter. If conditions are mild, they’ll be left outside to graze. (Not right now; the morning’s low temp was -4 degrees, so the snow ain’t gonna melt. White Thanksgiving sounds like a cheap knockoff of a better movie.)

  9. Joel says:

    Put up a fence then. You are living in free range country , but you can put a perimeter fence to control access .

    I may do that, yes. It’s the only action legally open to me. Saying I can do that is easy: Paying for it is something else entirely. Even a 4-strand fence, which is what most people use, is far beyond my means. But if I were going to go to the trouble and expense, were that possible, I’d want a more substantial fence that would not only keep critters out but also keep a certain big young dog in. May as well get some actual benefit from it, rather than just paying for an expensive nuisance to fence out other nuisances.

    In any case, it’s not financially possible.

  10. Joel says:

    I’m confused. Is there a rotation that makes sense, ie growing season vs barren ground. Why are they reintroducing cattle when they were just removed

    They don’t talk to me about these things but I can make an educated guess. All summer they let the breed bulls roam free, and I saw an awful lot of obviously pregnant cows. Meanwhile the steer calves were getting awfully big not to be rounded up. I thought they’d leave the preggers loose – the last operation to have this lease did that. But what I think they did was round them all up, let the birthings happen in feed lots or some more easily controlled surroundings, then castrate the male calves and release them with their mothers back in open range. They let very few female calves survive, only enough to replace cows that age out. It’s the males they want to sell for meat, so they kill the female calves right away so their mothers will dry up and go back into heat.

  11. Ben says:

    Anon says: “ Ya’ll gone throw away them jackstands?”

    Those are obviously TACTICAL jack stands. Way too valuable to throw away.

  12. Anonymous says:

    How much will a fence cost

  13. Spud says:

    Yeah you’re right . Fences are expensive, especially ones that can contain a dog.
    Perhaps one of those solar electric ones from Harbor freight ?

To the stake with the heretic!